Treatment For Acne

Treatment For Acne

Years ago, teenagers with acne were told to cut out the potato chips and given a tube of Clearasil. Today, we know far more about the reasons why some people develop acne and how it can most effectively be treated. All cases of acne are not created equal, and neither are all acne treatments. Although all acne has its roots in the same process — hormonal fluctuations that stimulate oil production — not all acne is equally severe and not all cases of acne will respond to the same types of treatments. Most cases of acne fit within one of three main categories, says Macrene Alexiades-Armenakas, MD, PhD, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Yale School of Medicine and a specialist in laser therapy for acne, who practices in New York City: Comedonal acne. This is the kind of mild acne that involves blackheads and whiteheads. It forms because a component of skin oil called sebum, along with old skin cells, block the pores of the skin. Comedonal acne appears most often on the forehead, nose, and chin. Inflammatory acne. This form of acne occurs when the area just under the “plug” (the blackhead or whitehead) becomes reddened and inflamed. Cystic acne . The most severe form of acne, cystic acne develops as the result of an actual infection in the area of the outbreak. Cystic acne often runs in families. It’s often very painful and can result in disfiguring, permanent scarring. The type of treatment that works for you will depend both on the kind of acne you have, and the additional factors that seem to trigger acne outbreaks. Treating Mild to Moderate Comedonal and Inflammatory Acne Most cases of mild comedonal acne occur in teenagers and young adults, and these can usually be treated with traditional topical creams and gels. The most common of these are retinoids, like Retin-A, Differin, Renova, and Tazorac. They work by unblocking clogged pores. Dermatologists will often combine a topical retinoid with an oral antibiotic, such as doxycycline, tetracycline, minocycline or erythromycin, which kills the bacteria that cause inflammation around the blocked pores.
treatment for acne 1

Treatment For Acne

Complete List Top Acne Related Articles Acne PictureExactly what causes acne? Acne develops when cells and natural oils begin to block up tiny hair follicles in the skin. See a picture of Acne and learn more about the health topic. Take the Acne QuizAcne is the most common skin disorder in the world. If you suffer from acne, you are not alone and many treatment options are available. Learn more about pimples, blackheads, and comedones with the Acne Quiz. Acne Visual DictionaryAcne is a common skin affliction that can be painful and embarrassing. Learn the different terms, types, and treatments of acne that affect both adults and teens. Adult Acne SlideshowAcne (pimples) is a skin condition that blocks pores. Get answers on causes, solutions and treatments for this skin condition that can still be a problem in adults. BoilsA boil is a skin abscess, a collection of pus localized deep in the skin. There are several different types of boils. Among them are the following: furuncle or carbuncle, cystic acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, and pilonidal cyst. Chemical PeelChemical peels are performed to reduce fine lines, treat wrinkles, improve the appearance of mild scarring, treat some types of acne, and reduce age spots. During the treatment, a chemical solution is applied to the skin. The skin blisters and eventually peels off. Cortisone InjectionCortisone injections are used to treat small areas of inflammation or widespread inflammation throughout the body. There is minimal pain from these injections, and relief from the pain of inflammation occurs rapidly. CystCysts are sac-like structures that may be filled with gas, liquid, or solid materials. Cysts may produce symptoms and signs depending on their location. Treatment of a cyst depends upon what caused the cyst in the first place. DermabrasionDermabrasion involves freezing and then sanding the skin. Dermabrasion improves the appearance of scars and other skin conditions, such as wrinkles and skin lesions. Possible side effects include darkening of the skin, scarring, infection, and uneven changes in skin color. Your Life & Your SkinSee how your life affects your skin. The choices you make every day affect the appearance of your skin. Learn how to avoid dry skin and wrinkles and to keep your skin healthy with these helpful beauty tips. Keratosis PilarisKeratosis pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder in which small white or red bumps appear around hair follicles on the upper arms, thighs, buttocks, and cheeks. The cause of KP is unknown. There is no cure for keratosis pilaris, and the condition may resolve on its own. Gentle exfoliation, professional manual extraction, chemical peels, and microdermabrasion, along with topical products, are the best treatments for this condition. MicrodermabrasionMicrodermabrasion is a skin-exfoliating treatment that may improve the condition of acne scars and fine wrinkles. Skin should feel softer and smoother after microdermabrasion. Side effects may include skin tightness, redness, fine broken blood vessels, and minor bruising. Photodynamic TherapyPhotodynamic therapy (PDT) is a procedure that treats precancerous cells, in addition to other types of cancer cells. The medical treatment does this with the help of a photosensitizing drug and a light source that activates the applied drug, destroying cancer cells. PDT is approved to treat non-small cell lung cancer, esophageal cancer, and Barrett’s esophagus. It’s used to treat actinic keratosis, as well as acne, rosacea, skin cancer, sun damage, oily skin, wrinkles, warts, psoriasis, and enlarged sebaceous glands. Puberty in Girls QuizTake the Puberty In Girls Quiz to learn the myths and facts about normal adolescent growth and development for teens and tweens. RosaceaRosacea is a skin disease that causes redness of the forehead, chin, and lower half of the nose. In addition to inflammation of the facial skin, symptoms include dilation of the blood vessels and pimples (acne rosacea) in the middle third of the face. Oral and topical antibiotics are treatments for rosacea. If left untreated, rhinophyma (a disfiguring nose condition) may result. Take the Rosacea QuizThink acne and rosacea are the same? Think again. Take the Rosacea Quiz to learn all about this inflammatory skin condition. Skin Problems SlideshowLearn to spot and treat skin conditions commonly found in adults such as acne, eczema, shingles, psoriasis, rosacea, hives, cold sores, razor bumps, athlete’s foot, and more. Sty (Stye)A sty is a bump that forms on the eyelid as a result of a blocked gland. Styes may be caused by infections, burns, or trauma to the eyelid. Most styes resolve on their own. The application of warm compresses can speed healing. In some cases, steroid injection or incision and drainage may be necessary. Keeping the area clean and consuming a diet high in omega-3-fatty acids may help prevent the formation of styes.
treatment for acne 2

Treatment For Acne

Continued Some women may prefer not to use oral contraceptives, or should not take them because they are smokers or otherwise at high risk. These women, as well as those who only get partial acne relief from contraceptives, are often prescribed a drug called spironolactone. This medication is a diuretic — that is, a “water pill” that causes frequent urination. It also blocks receptors for male hormones, which modulates the hormonal surges that can stimulate oil production, causing acne. Spironolactone isn’t approved by the FDA to treat acne and probably won’t be, Schlosser says, because as a generic drug there’s little motivation for a manufacturer to pay for the trials needed to go through the approval process. But most dermatologists agree that it works well as an acne treatment. Treating Severe Inflammatory or Cystic Acne When acne does not respond to the standard one-two punch of topical retinoids and oral antibiotics, patients have two other choices: the drug isotretinoin, or one of several procedure-based treatments for acne that involve using laser or light treatment to reduce inflammation and kill acne-causing bacteria. Isotretinoin is an extremely powerful treatment for acne, often clearing up severe, scarring breakouts that had not responded to any other treatments within a matter of a few months. But it also carries with it a host of risks and side effects, including inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, liver damage, bony malformations, depression, and a virtual certainty of severe birth defects for the babies of women who take isotretinoin while pregnant. In 2005, the FDA established an online tracking database, called iPledge, and now requires all patients to sign onto the database to continue receiving their prescriptions. The iPledge system requires women to submit two negative pregnancy tests before they can receive an initial prescription for isotretinoin. Women must also undergo a monthly pregnancy test before each refill. Men are also tracked because of isotretinoin’s depression risk. “Anyone taking really needs to be counseled properly about all of these risks,” Alexiades-Armenakas says. The drug also impairs wound healing, so if a patient with severe cystic acne begins taking the drug, those cysts typically resolve with scars. “It gets rid of the underlying problem, but you’re almost guaranteed to heal with scars if you’re at that level of inflammation when you start taking .”

Treatment For Acne

Treatment For Acne
Treatment For Acne
Treatment For Acne