Skin Cancer Screening

Skin Cancer Screening

What to expect at a SPOTme® skin cancer screening What is a skin cancer screening? A skin cancer screening is a visual inspection of your skin by a medical professional. No blood work is conducted at a screening. Why are skin cancer screenings necessary? Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States; in fact, 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. People of all colors and races can get skin cancer. There are many different types of skin cancer, including actinic keratoses (AK), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma. BCC and SCC are the most common forms of skin cancer, but melanoma is the most deadly. With early detection and proper treatment, the cure rate for BCC and SCC is about 95 percent. When melanoma is detected before it spreads, it also has a high cure rate. Regular self-skin exams and a yearly examination by a dermatologist help people find early skin cancers. Is the skin cancer screening free of charge? Yes. Dermatologists volunteer their time and expertise to provide SPOTme® skin cancer screenings as a free service through the American Academy of Dermatology. Who will provide the skin cancer screening? SPOTme® skin cancer screenings are made possible by American Academy of Dermatology members; board-certified dermatologists committed to detecting skin cancer in its earliest, most treatable stage and reducing incidence of the disease by raising awareness of effective skin cancer prevention techniques. How long with the screening take? Screenings take approximately 10 minutes, including completing the paperwork and getting your skin checked. Which areas of my body will be screened for skin cancer? If the screening is in a private setting, a full-body screening can be provided if you desire. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends full-body examinations whenever possible. If the screening is in a public setting with limited privacy, only exposed areas (face, neck, arms, hands, etc.) will be visually inspected for skin cancer. Will the screening take the place of my yearly exam with my dermatologist or physician? This is a rapid screening for skin cancer and should not replace or be a substitute for a yearly examination with your physician or dermatologist. Can I ask the medical personnel to look at my skin for other dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, acne, etc.? SPOTme® skin cancer screenings are for skin cancer only. Seek advice from your regular dermatologist for other dermatologic concerns. If you do not have a dermatologist, you can locate one in your area by using the Academy’s Find a Dermatologist tool or by calling the American Academy of Dermatology toll-free at 462-DERM. Why do I have to complete the form? The Registration and Report Personal Health Information (PHI) form is used to record your screening with both the volunteer medical personnel and the American Academy of Dermatology. The document also gives you a record of the screening details and should be used for follow-up treatment with your dermatologist if a suspicious lesion is found. The information provided at the bottom of the form communicates your rights under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Your signature is required to demonstrate your acknowledgement of these rights. How will the Academy use my personal information? The American Academy of Dermatology’s SPOTme® Skin Cancer Screening Program is committed to maintaining the highest level of confidentiality regarding participants’ information that we collect, use, maintain, and disclose. Participant information is used and disclosed only for the Program’s mission-related activities and operations, and in other limited circumstances such as when required for law enforcement or for public health activities. Read the Academy’s complete Statement of Privacy to learn more. What if I don’t have health insurance? Have you just had a free SPOTme® Skin Cancer Screening and been told that you have a spot on your skin that could be skin cancer? If you do not have health insurance, you can still get medical care. Find out how to follow up after a skin cancer screening if you do not have insurance.
skin cancer screening 1

Skin Cancer Screening

What is a skin cancer screening? A skin cancer screening is a visual inspection of your skin by a medical professional. No blood work is conducted at a screening. Why are skin cancer screenings necessary? Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States; in fact, 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. People of all colors and races can get skin cancer. There are many different types of skin cancer, including actinic keratoses (AK), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma. BCC and SCC are the most common forms of skin cancer, but melanoma is the most deadly. With early detection and proper treatment, the cure rate for BCC and SCC is about 95 percent. When melanoma is detected before it spreads, it also has a high cure rate. Regular self-skin exams and a yearly examination by a dermatologist help people find early skin cancers. Is the skin cancer screening free of charge? Yes. Dermatologists volunteer their time and expertise to provide SPOTme® skin cancer screenings as a free service through the American Academy of Dermatology. Who will provide the skin cancer screening? SPOTme® skin cancer screenings are made possible by American Academy of Dermatology members; board-certified dermatologists committed to detecting skin cancer in its earliest, most treatable stage and reducing incidence of the disease by raising awareness of effective skin cancer prevention techniques. How long with the screening take? Screenings take approximately 10 minutes, including completing the paperwork and getting your skin checked. Which areas of my body will be screened for skin cancer? If the screening is in a private setting, a full-body screening can be provided if you desire. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends full-body examinations whenever possible. If the screening is in a public setting with limited privacy, only exposed areas (face, neck, arms, hands, etc.) will be visually inspected for skin cancer. Will the screening take the place of my yearly exam with my dermatologist or physician? This is a rapid screening for skin cancer and should not replace or be a substitute for a yearly examination with your physician or dermatologist. Can I ask the medical personnel to look at my skin for other dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, acne, etc.? SPOTme® skin cancer screenings are for skin cancer only. Seek advice from your regular dermatologist for other dermatologic concerns. If you do not have a dermatologist, you can locate one in your area by using the Academy’s Find a Dermatologist tool or by calling the American Academy of Dermatology toll-free at 462-DERM. Why do I have to complete the form? The Registration and Report Personal Health Information (PHI) form is used to record your screening with both the volunteer medical personnel and the American Academy of Dermatology. The document also gives you a record of the screening details and should be used for follow-up treatment with your dermatologist if a suspicious lesion is found. The information provided at the bottom of the form communicates your rights under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Your signature is required to demonstrate your acknowledgement of these rights. How will the Academy use my personal information? The American Academy of Dermatology’s SPOTme® Skin Cancer Screening Program is committed to maintaining the highest level of confidentiality regarding participants’ information that we collect, use, maintain, and disclose. Participant information is used and disclosed only for the Program’s mission-related activities and operations, and in other limited circumstances such as when required for law enforcement or for public health activities. Read the Academy’s complete Statement of Privacy to learn more. What if I don’t have health insurance? Have you just had a free SPOTme® Skin Cancer Screening and been told that you have a spot on your skin that could be skin cancer? If you do not have health insurance, you can still get medical care. Find out how to follow up after a skin cancer screening if you do not have insurance.
skin cancer screening 2

Skin Cancer Screening

Screening Guidelines Share Email Print Skin Cancer Screening References Learn more about the research behind our skin cancer screening guidelines. Learn more Each year more than a million people in the United States are diagnosed with the most common forms of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma — which together are known as non-melanoma skin cancers. Fortunately there are ways to detect most non-melanoma skin cancers early, when they are curable. Melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, is not as common as the other two major types of skin cancer, accounting for approximately 62,000 new cases in the US in 2005. Because malignant melanoma can be deadly, and because the number of new melanoma cases has been steadily increasing over the past several decades, early detection and treatment of the disease is very important. Skin Cancer Screening Studies For people without a history of skin cancer in their families, no studies have been done to test the effectiveness of routine screening for melanoma. Periodic skin examinations are the key to diagnosing skin cancer at its earliest stage, when it is most easily cured. Most cases of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma first appear as changes in the skin, which, once noticed by the patient or primary care doctor, are then verified as skin cancer by a dermatologist after a skin examination and biopsy have been performed. Since basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas are almost always cured without specified screening, no studies have shown that such screening will improve the already high cure rates for those types of skin cancer. Family history is a risk factor for melanoma. In addition, there is strong evidence that the risk of melanoma increases for individuals who have atypical moles or many common moles. (Atypical moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, have irregular borders, vary in color, or are asymmetrical, meaning if you cut the mole in half, the two halves would not look the same.) Other melanoma risk factors include previous melanoma or non-melanoma skin cancers, skin that burns readily and fails to tan, freckling, blue eyes, red hair, and a history of blistering sunburns. To date, there is no evidence to show that screening individuals with any of these risk factors will reduce the number of melanoma deaths. Our Skin Cancer Screening Guidelines Our doctors do not recommend routine skin cancer screening. We do recommend lifelong dermatologic surveillance for patients with a personal history of melanoma. In addition, we recommend that individuals identified during routine care who meet any of the following criteria be considered for skin cancer risk assessment by a dermatologist: A family history of melanoma in two or more blood relatives The presence of multiple atypical moles The presence of numerous actinic keratoses (precancerous lesions that are grey to pink colored scaly patches of skin on sun-exposed areas of the body)