Different Types Of Skin Cancer

Different Types Of Skin Cancer

View About 8 out of 10 of all skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas (also called basal cell cancers). Basal cell cancers usually develop on areas exposed to the sun, especially the head and neck. They can appear as raised areas (like this one), and can be pale, pink, or red. They may have one or more abnormal blood vessels. View Basal cell carcinomas can occur anywhere on the body. They can appear as flat, pale or pink areas, like this one. Larger basal cell carcinomas may have oozing or crusted areas. View Basal cell carcinomas may also appear as raised, pink or red, translucent, shiny, pearly bumps that may bleed after a minor injury. They may have a lower area in their center, and blue, brown, or black areas. View Basal cell carcinomas tend to grow slowly. It’s very rare for a basal cell cancer to spread to other parts of the body. But if a basal cell cancer is left untreated, it can grow into nearby areas and invade the bone or other tissues beneath the skin. View Basal cell carcinomas can also develop on the scalp, so it’s important to check your scalp when you check the rest of your body for any new marks or growths. Many doctors recommend doing this once a month. View Basal cell carcinomas are more likely to develop in older people, but younger people also get them, probably because they are now spending more time in the sun with their skin exposed. View Men are more likely than women to develop basal cell carcinomas, but it’s important for anyone to get an unusual spot or growth checked by a doctor. Larger basal cell carcinomas may have oozing or crusted areas. View Basal cell carcinomas can sometimes be difficult to see, such as this one on the face. They can appear as pale, pink, or red, shiny or pearly bumps. View Basal cell cancers are often fragile and bleed easily. Sometimes they are found because people see a doctor about a “shaving cut” that doesn’t heal. View About 2 out of 10 skin cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (also called squamous cell cancers). Some of these cancers start as actinic keratoses (AK), a skin pre-cancer seen here. AKs are usually small, rough or scaly flesh-colored patches that tend to start on sun-exposed areas. Most AKs don’t turn into squamous cell cancers, but it can be hard sometimes for doctors to tell AKs apart from true skin cancers, so they may advise treating them. View Squamous cell carcinoma in situ, also called Bowen disease, is the earliest form of squamous cell skin cancer (SCC). Bowen disease usually appears as rough patches in sun-exposed areas, or sometimes in the skin of the anal or genital area. The patches tend to be larger, redder, and scalier than AKs. Bowen disease can be hard to tell apart from SCC and can sometimes progress to an invasive SCC, so doctors usually recommend treating it. View Squamous cell carcinomas may appear as flat reddish or brownish patches in the skin, often with a rough, scaly, or crusted surface. They tend to grow slowly and usually occur on sun-exposed areas of the body, such as the face, ears, neck, lips, and backs of the hands. View Squamous cell carcinomas can also develop in scars or skin sores on any part of the body. Squamous cell cancers are more likely to grow into deeper layers of skin and spread to other parts of the body than basal cell cancers, although this is still uncommon. View Squamous cell skin cancers tend to grow slowly and can almost always be cured if found early. But if not treated, these cancers can grow into nearby areas or even spread to other parts of the body, where they can be much harder to treat. View Almost everyone has some moles, and nearly all of them are harmless. A normal mole, like the one pictured here, is usually an evenly colored brown, tan, or black spot on the skin. It can be either flat or raised, round or oval. Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the cells that give skin its color. Normal moles also develop from these skin cells. But moles that are larger and have an abnormal shape or color can sometimes turn into melanoma. View Melanoma is much less common than basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers, but it is far more dangerous. Like this one, melanomas may have different colors and jagged borders. They may not be round, and one half might not look like the other half. View Melanomas can occur anywhere on the skin, but they are more likely to start in certain areas. The trunk (chest and back) is the most common site in men. The legs are the most common site in women. The neck and face are other common sites. View Melanomas often look different from other spots on the skin. It’s very important to see a doctor if you have any new moles, moles that are growing or changing in any way, or moles that concern you for any other reason. View Melanomas are usually brown or black, but some can appear pink, tan, or even white. Some melanomas have areas with different colors, and they might not be round like normal moles. They might grow quickly or even spread into the surrounding skin. View Sometimes melanomas can grow in places that can be hard to spot, like this one on the heel of the foot. This is one reason it’s important to check all over your skin, preferably once a month. Melanomas aren’t common in people with darker skin, but when they do occur, they are more likely to be on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, or under the nails. View Many types of benign (non-cancerous) tumors can grow on the skin. They do not usually cause serious problems. Still, if you notice any lumps, bumps, spots, sores, or other marks on your skin that are new or changing, or that worry you for any other reason, see a doctor so they can be identified and treated, if needed. Seborrheic keratoses are common benign (non-cancerous) skin growths. They often appear as tan, brown, or black raised spots with a waxy texture or rough surface. They are not contagious. View Warts are benign (non-cancerous) growths on the skin caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). They usually appear as lumps or bumps with a rough surface. While warts are not cancer, they can be spread through skin contact. View Warts are more common in areas where the skin was broken. For example, they can appear around the fingernails as a result of biting the nails or picking at hangnails. View Warts on the bottom of the feet are known as plantar warts. They can be hard to treat because they grow inward. This skin cancer image gallery was funded in part by a grant from Genentech.                  More In Cancer A-Z Cancer Basics Cancer Causes Breast Cancer Colon and Rectal Cancer Skin Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer View All Cancer Types
different types of skin cancer 1

Different Types Of Skin Cancer

View About 8 out of 10 of all skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas (also called basal cell cancers). Basal cell cancers usually develop on areas exposed to the sun, especially the head and neck. They can appear as raised areas (like this one), and can be pale, pink, or red. They may have one or more abnormal blood vessels. View Basal cell carcinomas can occur anywhere on the body. They can appear as flat, pale or pink areas, like this one. Larger basal cell carcinomas may have oozing or crusted areas. View Basal cell carcinomas may also appear as raised, pink or red, translucent, shiny, pearly bumps that may bleed after a minor injury. They may have a lower area in their center, and blue, brown, or black areas. View Basal cell carcinomas tend to grow slowly. It’s very rare for a basal cell cancer to spread to other parts of the body. But if a basal cell cancer is left untreated, it can grow into nearby areas and invade the bone or other tissues beneath the skin. View Basal cell carcinomas can also develop on the scalp, so it’s important to check your scalp when you check the rest of your body for any new marks or growths. Many doctors recommend doing this once a month. View Basal cell carcinomas are more likely to develop in older people, but younger people also get them, probably because they are now spending more time in the sun with their skin exposed. View Men are more likely than women to develop basal cell carcinomas, but it’s important for anyone to get an unusual spot or growth checked by a doctor. Larger basal cell carcinomas may have oozing or crusted areas. View Basal cell carcinomas can sometimes be difficult to see, such as this one on the face. They can appear as pale, pink, or red, shiny or pearly bumps. View Basal cell cancers are often fragile and bleed easily. Sometimes they are found because people see a doctor about a “shaving cut” that doesn’t heal. View About 2 out of 10 skin cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (also called squamous cell cancers). Some of these cancers start as actinic keratoses (AK), a skin pre-cancer seen here. AKs are usually small, rough or scaly flesh-colored patches that tend to start on sun-exposed areas. Most AKs don’t turn into squamous cell cancers, but it can be hard sometimes for doctors to tell AKs apart from true skin cancers, so they may advise treating them. View Squamous cell carcinoma in situ, also called Bowen disease, is the earliest form of squamous cell skin cancer (SCC). Bowen disease usually appears as rough patches in sun-exposed areas, or sometimes in the skin of the anal or genital area. The patches tend to be larger, redder, and scalier than AKs. Bowen disease can be hard to tell apart from SCC and can sometimes progress to an invasive SCC, so doctors usually recommend treating it. View Squamous cell carcinomas may appear as flat reddish or brownish patches in the skin, often with a rough, scaly, or crusted surface. They tend to grow slowly and usually occur on sun-exposed areas of the body, such as the face, ears, neck, lips, and backs of the hands. View Squamous cell carcinomas can also develop in scars or skin sores on any part of the body. Squamous cell cancers are more likely to grow into deeper layers of skin and spread to other parts of the body than basal cell cancers, although this is still uncommon. View Squamous cell skin cancers tend to grow slowly and can almost always be cured if found early. But if not treated, these cancers can grow into nearby areas or even spread to other parts of the body, where they can be much harder to treat. View Almost everyone has some moles, and nearly all of them are harmless. A normal mole, like the one pictured here, is usually an evenly colored brown, tan, or black spot on the skin. It can be either flat or raised, round or oval. Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the cells that give skin its color. Normal moles also develop from these skin cells. But moles that are larger and have an abnormal shape or color can sometimes turn into melanoma. View Melanoma is much less common than basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers, but it is far more dangerous. Like this one, melanomas may have different colors and jagged borders. They may not be round, and one half might not look like the other half. View Melanomas can occur anywhere on the skin, but they are more likely to start in certain areas. The trunk (chest and back) is the most common site in men. The legs are the most common site in women. The neck and face are other common sites. View Melanomas often look different from other spots on the skin. It’s very important to see a doctor if you have any new moles, moles that are growing or changing in any way, or moles that concern you for any other reason. View Melanomas are usually brown or black, but some can appear pink, tan, or even white. Some melanomas have areas with different colors, and they might not be round like normal moles. They might grow quickly or even spread into the surrounding skin. View Sometimes melanomas can grow in places that can be hard to spot, like this one on the heel of the foot. This is one reason it’s important to check all over your skin, preferably once a month. Melanomas aren’t common in people with darker skin, but when they do occur, they are more likely to be on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, or under the nails. View Many types of benign (non-cancerous) tumors can grow on the skin. They do not usually cause serious problems. Still, if you notice any lumps, bumps, spots, sores, or other marks on your skin that are new or changing, or that worry you for any other reason, see a doctor so they can be identified and treated, if needed. Seborrheic keratoses are common benign (non-cancerous) skin growths. They often appear as tan, brown, or black raised spots with a waxy texture or rough surface. They are not contagious. View Warts are benign (non-cancerous) growths on the skin caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). They usually appear as lumps or bumps with a rough surface. While warts are not cancer, they can be spread through skin contact. View Warts are more common in areas where the skin was broken. For example, they can appear around the fingernails as a result of biting the nails or picking at hangnails. View Warts on the bottom of the feet are known as plantar warts. They can be hard to treat because they grow inward. This skin cancer image gallery was funded in part by a grant from Genentech.                 

Different Types Of Skin Cancer

Different Types Of Skin Cancer
Different Types Of Skin Cancer
Different Types Of Skin Cancer
Different Types Of Skin Cancer
Different Types Of Skin Cancer