Baby Skin Rash

Baby Skin Rash

Continued Common Rashes in the First Few Months of a Baby’s Life Cradle cap (seborrhea) often shows up at 1-2 months of age. Greasy, yellowish crusts appear on the scalp and may include a red, irritating rash on the face, behind the ears, on the neck, and even in the armpits. Your doctor will tell you how to best treat this common condition, depending on your baby’s symptoms. Eczema is red, itchy patches on the skin, often seen on the baby’s chest, arms, legs, face, elbows, and behind the knees. It is caused by dry, sensitive skin, and sometimes allergies (although it can be difficult at this age to know what the trigger might be). Your doctor can determine if the rash looks like eczema and prescribe the appropriate treatment. In general, treatment consists of: Using a very gentle soapUsing a gentle detergent and no fabric softener in baby’s laundryUsing skin moisturizersApplying a steroid cream (like hydrocortisone or even a stronger one) if the eczema won’t go away Prickly heat looks like small red bumps, mostly on areas of your baby’s body that tend to overheat and sweat, like the neck, diaper area, and armpits. The treatment is to try to keep the area dry and avoid overheating by dressing him in loose-fitting clothing. A fungal infection (candidiasis) can show up in different ways on your baby. On the tongue, it is called thrush and looks like dried milk, which, unlike milk, cannot be scraped off. In the diaper area, candidiasis looks like an intense red rash, often with smaller bumps around the edges. A fungal infection loves moist, dark areas, so you’ll find redness due to it in the creases of the thighs. Candidiasis is treated with antifungal oral gel or liquid medicine (for oral thrush) or antifungal cream (for the diaper area), or both. Tips for Concerned Parents In the first few months of a baby’s life, any rash associated with other symptoms (such as fever, poor feeding, lethargy, or cough) needs to be evaluated by a doctor as soon as possible.
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Baby Skin Rash

When it comes to your baby’s skin, you can depend on one thing: It’s bound to erupt into a rash during the first year. Why? The human skin acts as a protective barrier against all sorts of elements, from sun to bacteria, but it takes about a year for that epidermis to get up to speed and function effectively, says Bernard Cohen, M.D., director of pediatric dermatology at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. It starts out thinner, has less pigment, and doesn’t regulate temperature as well as the skin of bigger kids and adults. Of course, no baby escapes the most common skin issue—diaper rash. The diaper area is warm and moist, which breaks down the skin on that tender tush. Add irritating poop and pee and you’ve got the perfect environment for breakouts. Keep diaper rash under control by changing your baby often, using petroleum jelly or a barrier cream with zinc oxide to protect his bum, and letting his naked bottom air out occasionally (put a sheet on the floor and let him loose). Protect the rest of that fragile birthday suit with mild products, such as hypoallergenic and fragrance-free soaps, washes and lotions. Once your baby turns 1, you can relax a little—his skin will be thicker and more rash-proof.
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Baby Skin Rash

Slide show: Common baby rashes Previous Next 1 of 6 Cradle cap You might expect your baby’s skin to be flawless, but baby rashes and other skin conditions — such as cradle cap — are common. Cradle cap appears as thick, yellow, crusty or greasy patches on a baby’s scalp. Cradle cap is most common in newborns and usually clears up on its own by age 6 months. In the meantime, wash your baby’s hair with mild baby shampoo and loosen the scales with a small, soft-bristled brush. For stubborn scales, rub petrolatum or a few drops of mineral oil onto your baby’s scalp, wait a few minutes, and then brush and shampoo your baby’s hair. If cradle cap persists, ask your baby’s doctor about other treatment options. Cradle cap Diaper rash Milia Baby acne Heat rash Baby eczema
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Baby Skin Rash

Rashes are one of the most common reasons that parents of small children visit the doctor. In most cases rashes do not indicate a dangerous condition, but in some cases they do. If a child is in good general health and has no other symptoms, you can simply observe the rash for a few days. Many types of rashes will disappear without treatment. If the rash is accompanied by high fever, breathing difficulties, vomiting, or reduced general health (when the child is not acting right), take your child to see a doctor, as it is often difficult to describe rashes over the telephone. One type of rash can have different causes, so let the doctor note what the rash looks like, how widespread it is, how many and how big the marks are, how long the rash has been present, and whether it is itchy.
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Baby Skin Rash

Fungal rashes are skin infections caused by two specific types of fungi: tinea and candida. Tinea infections, also known as ringworm, are oval or ring-shaped lesions with normal-looking skin in the middle and an itchy, scaly, and slightly raised edge around it. The rash can be found on the scalp, face, body, or nails. Candida infections may occur in babies as oral thrush, as a white coating on the tongue or mouth mucosa or as a shiny, red rash in the diaper region (infected diaper rash). Candida infections may occur in children of any age. They are usually located in the folds of moist skin, such as under a baby’s chin or the cracked skin between toes, accompanied by itching and sometimes nail discoloration (athlete’s foot).
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Baby Skin Rash

Previous Next 1 of 6 Cradle cap You might expect your baby’s skin to be flawless, but baby rashes and other skin conditions — such as cradle cap — are common. Cradle cap appears as thick, yellow, crusty or greasy patches on a baby’s scalp. Cradle cap is most common in newborns and usually clears up on its own by age 6 months. In the meantime, wash your baby’s hair with mild baby shampoo and loosen the scales with a small, soft-bristled brush. For stubborn scales, rub petrolatum or a few drops of mineral oil onto your baby’s scalp, wait a few minutes, and then brush and shampoo your baby’s hair. If cradle cap persists, ask your baby’s doctor about other treatment options.
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Baby Skin Rash

Is your baby sporting a sore, red and bumpy bottom? Then she’s most likely experiencing diaper rash, a skin irritation that’s typically caused by this tough trio: too much moisture, too little air and irritants (think everything from urine and stool to common baby products like diapers, wipes and soaps.) Your best defense is to keep her diaper as clean and dry as can be by changing her frequently. If a rash does develop, ramp up baby’s bare-butt time to at least 10 minutes before putting on a new diaper. Skip the wipes and try using a different type of soap during baths. If you don’t see improvements in two or three days, contact your pediatrician.
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Baby Skin Rash

Science Source 16 / 16Diaper RashIs your baby sporting a sore, red and bumpy bottom? Then she’s most likely experiencing diaper rash, a skin irritation that’s typically caused by this tough trio: too much moisture, too little air and irritants (think everything from urine and stool to common baby products like diapers, wipes and soaps.) Your best defense is to keep her diaper as clean and dry as can be by changing her frequently. If a rash does develop, ramp up baby’s bare-butt time to at least 10 minutes before putting on a new diaper. Skip the wipes and try using a different type of soap during baths. If you don’t see improvements in two or three days, contact your pediatrician.
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16 / 16Diaper RashIs your baby sporting a sore, red and bumpy bottom? Then she’s most likely experiencing diaper rash, a skin irritation that’s typically caused by this tough trio: too much moisture, too little air and irritants (think everything from urine and stool to common baby products like diapers, wipes and soaps.) Your best defense is to keep her diaper as clean and dry as can be by changing her frequently. If a rash does develop, ramp up baby’s bare-butt time to at least 10 minutes before putting on a new diaper. Skip the wipes and try using a different type of soap during baths. If you don’t see improvements in two or three days, contact your pediatrician.
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The most common allergic rash is hives, an extremely itchy rash that consists of raised large welts on the surface of the body, often circular with a pale center. Hives can result from an allergic reaction to medicines, foods, viral infections, or insect stings and bites. The rash moves around the body and usually lasts for three to four days before disappearing. Localized hives usually indicates direct skin contact with a substance that the person isn’t able to tolerate, such as plants, pollen, or foods.