Acne Treatment For Teens

Acne Treatment For Teens

Teens Up to 85% of adolescents experience acne. In spite of the fact that acne is so common, having acne during these vulnerable years can make a teen feel embarrassed and alone. Kids especially feel an intense pressure to look their best and conform to some flawless ideal. Teens are beginning to discover who they are while at the same time trying to cope with the physical changes in their bodies. Moodiness often results, straining their relationships with family members. As a parent, you may be at a loss when it comes to helping your child. Talking to your acne-prone teenager and encouraging them to express their feelings are helpful. Helping your child find the right acne treatment system that ultimately enables them to control their acne will go a long way in bolstering their confidence. Puberty is happening much earlier today than in previous generations. While it has been reported to begin as early as age seven, puberty in girls generally starts closer to age eleven or twelve and a little later in boys. Oily skin is one of the first signs. The increase in androgen hormones, which causes oil glands to enlarge and produce more oil, gets the ball rolling. Teen acne often starts with a few blackheads and little pimples around the nose, later spreading to the checks and forehead. Boys generally have more severe acne than girls. Athletes are more inclined to have acne on their backs, chests, shoulders, upper arms and even buttocks. Like all forms of acne, teen acne is treatable. Sadly, believing that acne is a rite of passage, teens often take it upon themselves to try every available “zit” cream in the drugstore, ending up with dry, irritated skin that is still breaking out. Hormones and genetics, which are beyond anyone’s control, are the main causes of acne. However, there are other factors at play, which you can control to prevent your acne from flaring. Cosmetics with a greasy consistency may clog pores so switching to an oil-free product is a smart move. Friction caused by pressure from bike helmets, backpacks, tight collars or baseball caps, or even constant touching of your skin, can worsen acne. Harsh scrubbing can irritate and dry out skin, making it susceptible to infection. And picking or squeezing blemishes spreads bacteria and increases inflammation often leading to more breakouts. Hormonal fluctuations from stress and menstrual cycles can make acne flare-up. Birth control pills may help reduce hormonal ups and downs. Exercise, sleep, and meditation have all been shown to help lessen stress levels. Prevention is key in controlling teen acne. Beyond managing the cofactors mentioned above, in most cases, you can clear visible breakouts and minimize future ones by treating your skin daily with the right combination of medicines. Getting help for your acne is critical to prevent it from worsening and potentially scarring.
acne treatment for teens 1

Acne Treatment For Teens

Up to 85% of adolescents experience acne. In spite of the fact that acne is so common, having acne during these vulnerable years can make a teen feel embarrassed and alone. Kids especially feel an intense pressure to look their best and conform to some flawless ideal. Teens are beginning to discover who they are while at the same time trying to cope with the physical changes in their bodies. Moodiness often results, straining their relationships with family members. As a parent, you may be at a loss when it comes to helping your child. Talking to your acne-prone teenager and encouraging them to express their feelings are helpful. Helping your child find the right acne treatment system that ultimately enables them to control their acne will go a long way in bolstering their confidence. Puberty is happening much earlier today than in previous generations. While it has been reported to begin as early as age seven, puberty in girls generally starts closer to age eleven or twelve and a little later in boys. Oily skin is one of the first signs. The increase in androgen hormones, which causes oil glands to enlarge and produce more oil, gets the ball rolling. Teen acne often starts with a few blackheads and little pimples around the nose, later spreading to the checks and forehead. Boys generally have more severe acne than girls. Athletes are more inclined to have acne on their backs, chests, shoulders, upper arms and even buttocks. Like all forms of acne, teen acne is treatable. Sadly, believing that acne is a rite of passage, teens often take it upon themselves to try every available “zit” cream in the drugstore, ending up with dry, irritated skin that is still breaking out. Hormones and genetics, which are beyond anyone’s control, are the main causes of acne. However, there are other factors at play, which you can control to prevent your acne from flaring. Cosmetics with a greasy consistency may clog pores so switching to an oil-free product is a smart move. Friction caused by pressure from bike helmets, backpacks, tight collars or baseball caps, or even constant touching of your skin, can worsen acne. Harsh scrubbing can irritate and dry out skin, making it susceptible to infection. And picking or squeezing blemishes spreads bacteria and increases inflammation often leading to more breakouts. Hormonal fluctuations from stress and menstrual cycles can make acne flare-up. Birth control pills may help reduce hormonal ups and downs. Exercise, sleep, and meditation have all been shown to help lessen stress levels. Prevention is key in controlling teen acne. Beyond managing the cofactors mentioned above, in most cases, you can clear visible breakouts and minimize future ones by treating your skin daily with the right combination of medicines. Getting help for your acne is critical to prevent it from worsening and potentially scarring.
acne treatment for teens 2

Acne Treatment For Teens

I'm starting to get pimples! What can I do to get rid of them? The bad news—There's no cure for acne. The good news—It usually clears up as you get older. In the meantime, there are a few things you can do to help keep those zits under control. Types of treatments Benzoyl peroxide Benzoyl peroxide wash, lotion, or gel—the most effective acne treatment you can get without a prescription. It helps kill bacteria in the skin, unplug oil ducts, and heal pimples. There are a lot of different brands and different strengths (2.25% up to 10%). The gel may dry out your skin and make it redder than the wash or lotion, so try the wash or lotion first. How to use benzoyl peroxide Start slowly—only once a day with a 5% wash or lotion. After a week, try using it twice a day (morning and night) if your skin isn’t too red or isn’t peeling. Don’t just dab it on top of your pimples. Apply a thin layer to the entire area where pimples may occur. Avoid the skin around your eyes. If your acne isn’t any better after 4 to 6 weeks, try a 10% lotion or gel. Use it once a day at first and then try twice a day if it doesn’t irritate your skin. Stronger treatments Retinoid. If benzoyl peroxide doesn’t get your zits under control, your doctor may prescribe a retinoid to be used on the skin (like Retin A, Differin, and other brand names). This comes in a cream or gel and helps unplug oil ducts. It must be used exactly as directed. Try to stay out of the sun (including tanning salons) when taking this medicine. Retinoids can cause your skin to peel and turn red. Antibiotics, in cream, lotion, solution, or gel form, may be used for “inflammatory” acne (when you have red bumps or pus bumps). Antibiotics in pill form may be used if the treatments used on the skin don’t help. Isotretinoin (brand names are Accutane, Amnesteem, Sotret, and Claravis) is a very strong medicine taken as a pill. It’s only used for severe acne that hasn’t responded adequately to other treatments. Because it’s such a powerful drug, it must never be taken just before or during pregnancy. There is a danger of severe or even fatal deformities to unborn babies. Patients who take this medicine must be carefully supervised by a doctor knowledgeable about its usage, such as a pediatric dermatologist or other expert in treating acne. Isotretinoin should be used cautiously (and only with careful monitoring by a dermatologist and psychiatrist) in patients with a history of depression. Don’t be surprisedif your doctor requires a negative pregnancy test, some blood tests, and a signed consent form before prescribing isotretinoin. Remember The following are things to keep in mind no matter what treatment you use: Be patient. Give each treatment enough time to work. It may take 3 to 6 weeks or longer before you see a change and 12 weeks for maximum improvement. Be faithful. Follow your program every day. Don't stop and start each time your skin changes. Not using it regularly is the most common reason why treatments fail. Follow directions. Not using it correctly can result in treatment failure or troublesome side effects. Only use your medicine. Doctors prescribe medicine specifically for particular patients. What's good for a friend may not be good for you. Don't overdo it. Too much scrubbing makes skin worse. Too much benzoyl peroxide or topical retinoid creams can make your face red and scaly. Too much oral antibiotic may cause side effects. Don't worry about what other people think. It's no fun having acne, and some people may say hurtful things about it. Try not to let it bother you. Most teens get some acne at some point. Also remember that acne is temporary, and there are a lot of treatment options to keep it under control.

Acne Treatment For Teens

Acne Treatment For Teens
Acne Treatment For Teens
Acne Treatment For Teens
Acne Treatment For Teens